AI-powered consumer health app K debuts in Huntsville

AI-powered consumer health app K debuts in Huntsville

A consumer health app that its creators say already has more than 100,000 users around the world is making its U.S. debut today in Huntsville.

K, which uses artificial intelligence applications to offer free health information, has partnered with Integrity Family Care of Madison, a primary care practice.

"We were looking for smart, tech saavy consumers open to using new technology, and finding forward thinking providers," said Laura Cave, marketing coordinator. "It just came together."

K, short for knowledge, was founded in 2016 and is a venture-backed health technology company based in New York City and Tel Aviv. The app launched in Israel in January.

Users download it and then chat about any symptoms they have. K then asks detailed questions and compares the user's case to similar issues among people of the same age and gender. The user then sees how those people were diagnosed and treated.

If the user prefers, they can share the information with Integrity Family Care if they wish for a provider to take a look. 

K is geared to work for adults ages 18 to 85 years old. Its creators say it can address primary care conditions like cold and flu, allergies, UTI, eye infections, back pain, headaches, and chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension and COPD.

Cave said K was developed using 25 years' worth of health maintenance organization data from Israel, involving millions of patients and their doctors' visit notes. The data was used while preserving anonymity, she said.

Using artificial intelligence programming, the app takes the data provided by the user, looking at its database information, and connects to similar cases.

"It's not a treatment, it's not a diagnosis," Cave said. "They can share their report with a provider as long as they've established care with just one visit."

The report may result in advice, a prescription or a visit, but care is always delivered by a doctor.

"About 80 percent of the people who share their report are able to manage their condition from home," Cave said.

For more information, visit the website.

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